sp_BlitzCache: The Law Of Averages

Like vim, I Can’t Quit You

I’m going to be honest with you, I have no idea how most people who use sp_BlitzCache run it.

Most people I talk to are like “oh, that’s not sp_Blitz?”

Ahem.

Anyway, I’m going to show you a cool way to look at your plan cache a little bit more differenter than usual.

Average The Life

When you run it and use @SortOrder, it will sort by the “total” column of whichever metric you pick. CPU, Reads, Duration, Writes — you get the picture.

But you can also run it to sort by what uses the most of a metricĀ on average.

Sure, totals point out what runs a lot — but things that run a lot might not have much to tune.

You can make a note like “Should we be caching this?” for you developers to laugh at.

Here are some examples:

No, memory grant isn’t an average. But it can show you some real bangers.

Here’s an example of why you should use those average sort orders:

Public Visitation

Those queries all executed a whole bunch. They racked up a bunch of total CPU time.

But looking at any of those execution plans, aside fromĀ not running the query so much, there’s nothing really to tune.

We met at GitHubs

But if we look at the plan cache by averages…

Told her she take me back

We get… Alright, look. Those queries all have recompile hints. They still show up.

But the top one is interesting! It has way higher average CPU than the rest.

I’ll make more pull requests

This query plan is a little bit different. It’s scanning the clustered index rather than seeking, and it’s got a missing index request.

In total, it wasn’t using a lot of CPU compared to other queries, but on average it was a lot suckier.

SQL University

I always look at the averages, because you can find some really interesting plans in there.

Sure, you might find some one-off stuff that you can ignore, but that’s what @MinimumExecutionCount is for.

You did read the documentation, didn’t you?

Queries that use a lot of resources on average often stand a good chance at being tuned, where queries that just use a lot of resources because of how frequently they run may not.

Anyway, that’ll be $1.

Thanks for reading!

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